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Low Temperature and Condensed Matter Physics
    PAST: CHEX CVX LPE ZENO
    PRESENT: Ongoing Research
    FUTURE: BEST DYNAMX EXACT KISHT MISTE SUE SHE

Launch Date: Proposed Mission
Mission Duration: 6 months
Principle Investigator: Prof. John Lipa, Stanford University

 

SUE image

Key Questions We Want to Answer:

Scientists have learned the importance of changing various aspects of an experiment, that do not appear to be relevant, to make sure they have not overlooked something that might have an affect on the outcome. In the case of the Superfluid Universality Experiment (SUE), pressure will be changed to see if previously obtained results are altered.

What We Already Know:

Scientists have extensively studied the phase transitions that occur when helium is supercooled into a liquid, then furthered cooled into a superfluid. With the SUE mission, they will gather additional information about those transitions in a microgravity environment under a range of different pressures.

What We Hope to Find Out:

Because a fundamental aspect of all phase transition theories is universality, changing seemingly non-key parameters in an experiment should not change the results. SUE will be the most stringent test of this principal of universality, which forms the basis of our understanding of a wide assortment of phenomena in nature, ranging from the formation of subatomic particles to variations in the cosmic-ray background.

How We'll Conduct Our Experiment:

SUE is the size of a coffee cup. The outer container is made of Niobium, because the sensors used for measurement are sensitive to magnetic fields. Niobium provides a good shield against these fields.



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